Louis Pauwels

Louis Pauwels

French editor and author

An author and journalist and managing editor of Figaro Magazine and Figaro Madame. His controversial book “Monsieur Gurdjieff” (1954) influenced public attitudes towards Gurdjieff for a number of years.
 
Louis Pauwels is a French journalist and writer, born in Belgium 2 August 1920 and died January 28, 1997.
Born in Ghent, Belgium but raised in France by Gustave Bouju, his father-legged because of the remarriage of his mother French, Louis Pauwels pronounced his own name, Povel, and pointed to Jacques Chancel in one of his " X-ray "that was how he had to decide, even if the exact pronunciation in Flanders had been 'Pols'. Teacher at Athis-Mons from 1939 to 1945 (Letters license suspended early in the
war), Louis Pauwels wrote in many literary magazines monthly French in 1946 (Spirit, Variety, etc..) And during the 1950s.
After the war, he helped found "Work and Culture" in 1946 (close to the PCF, for the mass culture, which he is the secretary), then enters Gurdjieff groups in 1948 for fifteen long months, after which he became editor of Combat in 1949 and columnist for the newspaper Paris-Presse. He will lead (among others) the Library World (forerunner of the "Pocket Book"), Carrefour, the monthly women's magazine Marie Claire, and the magazine Arts and Culture in 1952. He published several novels during this period, including the highly acclaimed Love Monster, which are considered avant-garde novels, despite their more classical style. Love monster of votes received Prix Goncourt in 1955 and was cited by Serge Gainsbourg in his famous song "Initials BB".
With Jacques Bergier (met in 1954 when he was literary editor of The Library World), he wrote in 1960 The Morning of the Magicians, in 1970 and subsequently suspended from the eternal Man. On November 25, 1960, he interviews Maurice Papon, Prefect of Paris police, making a portrait of him as a "humanist philosopher" Papon has just published The era of responsibility, a year before the massacre of 17 October 1961 .
The Morning of the Magicians and its extension periodic Planet Magazine, worth at Pauwels celebrity and create a craze in France for the paranormal, lost civilizations, and the mysteries of science.
An unusual convergence of literary merit and heartfelt experience, these essays by Pierre Schaeffer were first published in the anthology Gurdjieff, edited by Louis Pauwels in 1954. Pauwels mixes his notions of the occult and politics to brew conspiracy theories. He casts Gurdjieff as “scandalous”. His book Monsieur Gurdjieff first edition published in Paris France in 1954 by Editions du Seuil. He reconsidered and came to recognize that the Gurdjieff teaching was one of the most important and positive elements in his life.

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